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Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
for word of every doe midwest incommunication in this country. >> the idea that n.s.a. is keeping files on americans as a general rule just isn't true. >> woodruff: then, rebels fired scores of rockets on the syrian city of homs as the assad regime celebrated army day. margaret warner gets the latest on the bloody civil war from npr's deborah amos. >> brown: law enforcement bids farewell to f.b.i. director robert mueller. ray suarez explores the transformation of the bureau after the 9-11 attacks. >> woodruff: and we hear from two u.s. senators leading the push to keep the military's sexual assault cases in the chain of command. gwen ifill talks to new hampshire republican kelly ayotte and missouri democrat claire mccaskill. >> the other side has wanted to make this argument about victims vs. uniforms. that's a false premise. this argument is about how we can protect victims the best. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by th
. obama and the nsa overhaul. >> i wanted to ask you about your evolution on the surveillance issues, even as recently as june you said that these -- the process was such that people should be comfortable with it, and now you are saying -- you are making these reforms and people should be comfortable with those. so why should the public trust you on this issue and why did you change your position multiple times? >> well, i think it's important to say -- i haven't ainvolved in my assessment of the actual programs. in light of thing changed environment where a whole set of questions have been raised, some in the most sensationalized manner possible, where these leaks are released drip by drip, one a week, to kind of maximize attention, and see if they can catch us at some imprecision on something. in light of that, it makes sense for us to go ahead, lay out what exactly we're doing, have a discussion with congress, have a discussion with industry, which is also impacted by this have a discussion with the civil libertarians and see, can we do this bert. >> that was president obama facing skep
snowden? his lawyer will not say, but he did confirm the fugitive nsa analyst has been granted temporary asylum in russia and has left the airport transit area. >> what concern is his place of residence? he will choose it himself. he can live in a hotel or an apartment. he is one of the most wanted people on earth. they will make sure his place of residence is absolutely safe. >> snowden could attempt to reach countries who have offered him asylum. >> latin america is a far way off in more ways than just geography. >> it's snowden stays in russia, he could become a stumbling block in u.s.-russian relations. washington wants moscow to extradite snowden to face charges of espionage and the theft of class of five nsa documents, but that is something the russian government has declined to do. >> where might snowden be? is he safe? for more, let's cross over to our moscow correspondent. do we have any idea where snowden may be and what his conditions are for him in russia? >> his whereabouts are still the big secret that is not revealed due to security reasons. for told the last image was a m
pwas given asylum in moscow. i expect him to talk about the issue and answer questions on the nsa civilian -- nsa surveillance program, to explain it because there is a growing distrust in the u.s. when it comes to privacy. from what i can speculate -- i think also he will touch n the peace talks between israelis and palestinians. >> in washington with our crystal ball, thank you very much. >> let's not forget that this cooling of relations resulted from russia granting asylum to nsa whistleblower edward snowden. now in a related story, a secure e-mail service thought to be used by snowden has been abruptly closed down. the service, lavabit, appears to have made the decision to shut itself down rather than comply with demand by the government to provide access to customer information. >> the company owner said in a statement, "i have been forced to make a difficult decision -- to become complicit in crimes against the american people or walk away from nearly 10 years of hard work by shutting down lavabit." u.s. president barack obama has spent part of the week huddling to brainsto
. >> consequences are being drawn from the nsa's global spying for graham. the foreign ministry has announced it is ending a kids- old surveillance agreement. it was a joint understanding. >> the decision comes as new reports show cooperation -- corporations working with authorities to gather private data. companies developed software to help in the surveillance. >> britain's a guest spy agency. it is reported to have even paid telecommunications customer need companies to snoop on customers. the data lines are utilized by internet users by other countries. >> we must untangle this web. intelligence agencies are the responsibility of the government. if private companies are involved that can only happen under special circumstances. >> german lawmakers want to know more about the spying revelations and what the government knew about british and american snooping activities. chancellor merkel's chief of staff is to be grilled again in 10 days time. >> how significant is the cancellation of the intelligence agreement with london and washington question mark this had been in the works for a while
down on what n.s.a. is doing? >> well, the grehing is we live a democracy. if we don't like what n.s.a. is doing we can get rid of the government and put in a different government. i think -- actually we've been collecting this information for so long, and long before n.s.a. was collecting it. let me tell you who was collecting it: american express, visa, all of your credit card data we have -- all of your financial records. this whole issue of privacy is utterly fascinating to me. for example, we could do a much better job in the whole new area of privacy which is medical records. >> rose: right. >> if we could take our medical records and put them in a database we could then figure out what drugs worked for what people. so we take all the medical records then all the gino mick data about the people and we put in the a database and figure out what therapies they're getting, what therapies work and don't work because there's this big database where you should take lipitor, you should take crestor. it could be very scientific. we could do a draw dramatically better job of treating peopl
next month. voters are angered i the allegations that the nsa targeted the massive spying program and the german government was complicit. the government is fighting back. >> germany's foreign intelligence service, ded, uses its installation in bavaria to survey the world. some of that information is shared with the national security agency from the u.s.. in parliament, a scandal. the social democrats want access. and it is the center-right that says that it was these social democrats who came up with the information sharing all they were in government. >> this agreement is based on a policy decision from the former chancellor and chief of staff. >> under chancellor gerhard schroeder, he was responsible for cord knitting the agencies. today he serves as the chief of a parliamentary group. this is seen as a campaign issue ahead of the general election next month. it cracks -- >> it is total hypocrisy for the spd to be outraged at the cooperation between the nsa and the dd. >> they say that the government is trying to dodge the implications. >> germany is one of the top arms exporte
of a new n.s.a. spying program on internet activity. we look at the latest revelations and the secret court at the center of the controversy. >> ifill: then, ben bernanke's tenure as federal reserve chairman nears its end, as the debate over who will replace him
and appointing an n.s.a. representative committed to privacy, and inviting outside experts to review how the government does its surveillance. the measures come as the administration has faced mounting scrutiny over its surveillance programs following the leaks from former spy agency contractor edward snowden. mr. obama was asked if today's move changed his mindset about snowden. >> is he now more a whistle- blower than he is a hacker, as you called him at one point, or somebody that shouldn't be filed charges? and should he be provided more protection? is he a patriot? >> i don't think mr. snowden was a patriot. as i said in my opening remarks, i called for a thorough review of our surveillance operations before mr. snowden made these leaks. my preference-- and i think the american people's preference-- would have been for a lawful, orderly examination of these laws; a thoughtful, fact-based debate that would then lead us to a better place, because i never made claims that all the surveillance technologies that have developed since the time some of these laws had been put in place someh
for joining us. coming up in the show -- >> a promise from the nsa -- germany's top intelligence minister says the u.s. has offered adeal great >> could israel a someone's doom peace talks before they begin? >> and the row between britain and spain over gibraltar is heating up. london is sending out warships area -- warships.
of information he has about american intelligence about the n.s.a. for their own good. that would be acting they might consider in their own national interest. so are they doing that giving him everything he knows? >> and you can ask the same question about the chinese when he was in hong kong. >> rose: what do you assume? >> i would assume that their intelligence services would be delinquent in their duty if they didn't make every effort to do that. i don't know the answer. >> rose: i talked to a former c.i.a. person and said would we be doing that if we had the opportunity? of course. >> his father says it hasn't happened. i don't know. i don't know. >> rose: okay, what about syria? is -- where do you think -- where do you think the effort to put together some kind of -- and the united states desperately wants and john kerry desperately wants russian cooperation to figure out a way to stop syria from becoming a stalemate and a civil war that just goes on and on and on. >> rose: and putin wants it, too. so you would think that would be enough to act on. here's the conflict no story began y
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)

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